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Directions for Mounting Emmert Vise

 The "Iron Hand" AMONG

Wood Workers Vises

MANUFACTURED BY

THE EMMERT MANFG. CO.

WAYNESBORO. PA.. U. S. A.


DIRECTIONS

LOCATION OF THE VISE

FIRST—Some place the vise even with the corner of bench; others place it back, say twelve inches or more, depending somewhat on location of bench leg.

SECOND—To mount vise even with end of bench (see Fig. 2) fit vise into bench so that the face of rear jaw extends one eighth of an inch be beyond face of bench plank. Cut bench as in Fig. 1.

THIRD—Some mount vise as shown in Fig. 4, cutting bench as in Fig. 3.

FOURTH—Remove front jaw of vise while mounting. This can readily be done by unscrewing vise full length of square beam. The remainder of vise will not be so heavy to handle while fitting to bench. CAUTION — When replacing, the front jaw of vise be careful to see that square beam passing into back jaw of vise also enters the collar in end of hub, otherwise you would break the collar if screw pressure is applied.

 

FIFTH—Place stop bar bracket (see Fig 5 Part A) against shoulder of stop bar (see Fig. 5 Part B) and make face of jaws square with top of bench plank and fasten stop bar, bracket bench A. If the bench is less than three inches thick where the stop bar bracket A fastens to it, underlay bracket with a wooden block as shown in Fig. 5 Part C.

SIXTH—If vise works stiff at first, this is no bad fault and will disappear after a few days' use. Remove paint from bearings by using a little kerosene or turpentine.

SEVENTH—Keep all working parts well oiled, especially when vise is as yet new.

ITS MERITS

To get the greatest amount of good from this vise the workman most think ahead.

The longer the experience with it the more he will be able to apply it to his work and the more he will appreciate it. If a greater incline is needed than that is had from the tilting jaw, a wedge shaped block may be screwed to the tilting jaw.

The slotted holes in front and rear jaws are intended to permit the workman to attach wood pads or blocks to make a wooden jaw vise. The slotted holes will engage flat head wood screws fastened in back of pad or black. This the pads or blocks may be readily detached when not needed.

EMMERT MFG. CO.

WAYNESBORO PA, U.S.A